MA350:
What's impressive is how well the sound sits together. It's a very natural, listenable audio. 

MA350:
RHA only has a single set of in-ear earphones in its range, but don’t assume they’re an afterthought. The distinctive shape – which reminds us a little of a B&O speaker, with its arching aluminum cone – is apparently based upon “the aerophonic design of a trumpet’s bell” while the fabric-braided (non-detachable) cable and gold-plated connectors are carried over from the headphone line.

Read the full article at http://www.slashgear.com/rha-sa-850-sa-500-and-ma-350-review-09170442/ 

Find out more about the MA450i.

What HiFI 5 Star

MA350:
The RHAs sing in a natural, unforced manner, and consequently remain an easy listen even through the entirety of a long haul flight.

MA350:
Everything’s relative, of course, but the RHA MA-350 look pretty bulky. Fortunately, the big aluminium enclosures (shaped aerophonically, in the manner of a trumpet’s bell) are lightweight and a comfy fit.
And the MA-350s are a gratifyingly poised listen. The 10mm driver doesn’t place undue emphasis on any particular area of the frequency range, instead delivering an even, balanced sound – dynamism and punch are on the menu, certainly, but not at the expense of detail or subtlety.
The RHAs sing in a natural, unforced manner, and consequently remain an easy listen even through the entirety of a long-haul flight.

Read the full article at What Hi-Fi

Find out more about the MA350.

Audioholics

MA350:
With an all aluminum construction, 10mm driver, braided fabric-covered cable, and a compact and light-weight design, RHA thought about everything

MA350:
The RHA MA350 headphones have, for me, redefined the $40 price point. With an all aluminum construction, 10mm driver, braided fabric-covered cable, and a compact and light-weight design, RHA thought about everything. While I found them too bass-heavy for my liking, they really don't have any downsides sonically. If you are on the market for a $40 earbud, these should definitely be on your list.

One thing I try to do as much as I can when reviewing a product, is to start the review before I know the price. As you might imagine, this isn't always possible. Most times, I've gotten some sort of press release about a product and decided to ask for a review sample. Invariably, those press releases list the price of the headphones. But when you do as many headphone reviews as I do, it is easy to get mixed up - to forget which headphones cost what. That said, The RHA MA350 headphones came and I really had no idea what they cost. All I had to go on was the design and how well I thought they sounded. 

RHA (stands for Reid Heath...Audio?) is a UK company that prides themselves on audio quality.

Now, if that is not a mission statement, I don't know what is. Take out the Glasgow part and the funny spelling of center and this should be on the wall of every audio manufacturer. 

The MA350 are some of the smallest earbuds I've ever reviewed. They look like a cross between those ones you get with your iPod that are meant to be just wedged in your ear and actual earbuds. What you end up with when you put them in, is a mix of both. They sit very flush to your ear and, depending on the shape of your ear, they may actually stay put a bit better than larger earbuds. They are extremely light. The specifications list them as 11 grams but that's with the cord and everything. Each of the earbuds weigh a fraction of that - which assists in keeping them in place. 

The enclosures are machined from solid aluminum and they feature a fabric braided cable. The design is a standard black and polished aluminum which, while not all that exciting, has a sort of understated class. The only easily visible markings on the MA350s is the RHA logo on the back of the enclosure.

Taking in the weight, the design, the enclosure, the fabric cable...I made some assumptions about the price. I can say that I was very off the mark. I would have guessed by their design (and my early listening tests), that the RHA MA350s would have been priced around $100. I wouldn't have been surprised if you had told me $150. I was, however, shocked that they retail for under $40. Honestly, it made me rethink everything I thought I knew about headphones.

I have funny shaped ears. I'm now convinced of that. When I review in-ear products, I often have problems keeping them into place. Even the molded ones and I haven't gotten along very well. What I really want are headphones that will stay in place when I wear my motorcycle helmet.

Alas, the search is still on.

The RHA MA350s weight gives them a huge advantage over most of the competition. Being so light, they don't pull free nearly as easily as the rest. Like many earbud options out there, the MA350s use silicone tips. They offer small, medium, and large options. I've seen smaller (and larger) tips offered by other companies. They've also forgone the inclusion of the foam tip for maximum sound isolation - an odd exclusion considering RHA bills the MA350s as "Noise isolating aluminum earphones."

From a noise isolating standpoint, the MA350s work well. Just about the same as sticking your fingers in your ears. Add in some music and you can't really hear anything that's going on outside. This isn't all that different (and nothing in the MA350 design makes me think that it should be) than any of the other in-ear earbud offerings.

The fabric-covered cable has an adjustable choke at the Y-junction. The cable is the standard 1.2 meters in length and is tipped with a 3.5mm gold-plated connector. The end is straight instead of at a right angle. While I prefer a right-angled tip to the straight option (for in-pocket use), it really isn't much of a issue of contention for me. The only other accessory is a small velvet carrying case.

Not included is any sort of in-line controls or mic for use with your smartphone. At $40, that really isn't all that surprising. What is surprising is that RHA didn't include any way of attaching or securing the cable to your clothing. I realize that the adjustable choke can be used in a similar fashion, but I appreciate some sort of clip as I'm often wearing a single headphone when out and about.

The most egregious omission of the RHA MA350s is easily visible left/right markings. I've seen manufacturers that will use different color silicone tips, some that clearly mark the cable, but I've never seen anyone put a little, raised, black L or R on a little black cable. In bright light it is hard to read. Forget about it in dim light or in the dark. With markings this indistinct, I'm surprised that RHA didn't just put them in braille. That would have be just as useful to me.

f you are familiar with in-ear headphones, you will be familiar with the comfort level of the RHA MA350s. Because they sit in your ears so tightly, you might find them initially slightly more uncomfortable than other earbuds, but that quickly fades. Because they are so light, any weight-based fatigued is all but eliminated.

The last thing I will say about using the RHA MA350s is about the cable. Fabric cables are a bit of a fad in headphones these days and I really wish they'd just go away. While I understand that they usually exhibit less drag than rubber-coated cables, I believe the downsides outweigh the up. Sure, the drag is less, especially when you are using them when you are working out, but think about it. Fabric + sweat = stink. Add to that the fact that fabric cables are much more prone to kinking and give me a rubber cable any day. But, if you disagree, or just prefer fabric, feel free to dismiss my rantings as the ravings of the lunatic fringe. You wouldn't be the first (on this issue and many others).

The RHA MA350 earbuds use a 10mm Mylar driver with a specified frequency response from 16Hz to 22kHz. Many earphones brag such wide response numbers, ones that most speakers would give their bottom woofer for, but few actually live up to the hype. The MA350s have a trumpet-like shape that "naturally transfers sound from the speaker to the ear." RHA calls this an Aerophonic design. While I'm not going to debate the viability of this design, it does show that RHA is putting some thought into their design for reasons other than to make them flashy. If anything, the RHA design is too understated. With a design this low-key, the sound quality better be good. 

Usually, when I finish my listening tests, I do a quick Google search to see what others (if any, I'm often one of the first to receive samples) say about the product. I find that, most times, my thoughts are at least in line with other, professional reviewers.

Not this time.

My experience with the RHA MA350 earbuds has been completely different than others. Working from the top-end down, I find the highs of the RHA MA350s to be well-extended and not at all fatiguing. I wouldn't call them a laid-back headphone but you certainly won't find them giving you a headache after a few minutes of listening. The midrange seems mostly okay except where it rolls into the bass region.

The RHA MA350 earbuds are one of the few headphones I've used where I wish I could turn the bass down. Usually, headphones, regardless of price, suffer from poor bass. They try to hit low but, too often, they either don't have the extension or the output. The MA350s have both. In spades.

This makes me wonder what is up with the other reviewers out there. Too often, reviewers are afraid to contradict each other for fear of either being wrong, or somehow disrespecting the other professionals.

Yeah, that's not me.

The general consensus from what I read was that the RHA MA350s have decent bass but the high end is a bit fatiguing. I didn't feel that at all. If you are a lover of bass-heavy music, you are either going to love these headphones or wish to turn the bass down as I did. With well recorded tracks, the RHA MA350s easily performed many times their $40 price point. Especially if the tracks had normal to light bass. But with bass heavy tracks like "Crazy" by Seal, and just about anything mixed in the last five years, the bass was so overpowering as to be muddy, distracting, and pretty much overshadowed the earphones performance.

I love to use the track "Junior B" by Yello for analyzing bass. It is a bass run at the beginning that will quickly reveal if a subwoofer has the goods or not. With the RHA MA350s, they laughed at this near-sub-sonic run and asked for more. For the first time, I felt like a pair of earphones really lived up to their 16Hz low-point.

With more recent recordings, specifically anything designed with heavy bass in mind, the RHA MA350s didn't fare as well. Because the bass was so prominent, it blurred the entire presentation, destroying any sense of imaging or soundstage. Without the overblown bass, the imaging of the RHA MA350s wasn't stellar but it certainly justified their $40 price point.

All in all, however, RHA has redefined the $40 price point. While they aren't flat, by any means, they are easy to wear for long times, they have prodigious amounts of bass, and they aren't at all fatiguing. The only physical problems I had with the MA350s is that the braided cable will transfer and noise from anything rubbing against it into your ear. This is a physical transference of the sound and can only be eliminated by decoupling the braided cable from the earphone. Depending on how you plan on using the MA350s, this may or may not bother you.

The RHA MA350 headphones have, for me, redefined the $40 price point. With an all aluminum construction, 10mm driver, braided fabric-covered cable, and a compact and light-weight design, RHA thought about everything. While I found them too bass-heavy for my liking, they really don't have any downsides sonically. If you are on the market for a $40 earbud, these should definitely be on your list.

Find out more about the MA350.

AP

MA350:
The amount of detail able to be drawn out by these headphones amazed me - I've never heard something on this side of the $50 mark quite so able to extract the subtleties of a song.

MA350:

The MA350
The MA350 is an earbud produced by RHA, subsidiary of the UK firm Reid Heath Ltd., based in Glasgow. RHA currently manufacture only two models earbud, both of which use the same audio guts - one of them just has inline controls. The MA350's are the model without them. They retail for $40 (buy here). A small carrying pouch and three sets of eartips are included.

The Sound


For $40, the RHA MA350's produce sound that is - I would argue - far more comparable to headphones of the $80-100 range. My primary point of comparison, therefore, were my trusty old Etymotic Research hf2's (equivalent to the hf5, which are $100 street price, $150 MSRP).


Being dynamic driver headphones, as compared to the balance armature Etymotics, there were bound to be major differences in the sound - and there are. Now, to be fair, I am comparing one headphone to another with a suggested price three times as high. So keep that in mind. I didn't have a pair of crappy iPod or in-the-box smartphone earbuds to put them up against.


The MA350's claim to fame is RHA's "reverse trumpet"-shaped soundhole which the driver sends audio through to your ear. They claim this produces a more balanced output across the spectrum of sound, which I'm not sure I really buy - but I'm not an expert on earbuds acoustics (or, as RHA calls it - aerophonics, which frankly has far more to do with instruments that headphones).

The sound signature of the MA350's is interesting. Bass-heavy, to be sure, but not to the point of sounding unnatural. They sound like a solid, powerful dynamic driver earbud. Bass also isn't so extreme that it overwhelms the decidedly gentler mids, and is fairly tight, with little muddiness. The mids feel a little too subdued to my ears, resulting in a somewhat "compressed" sound at times (like your ears need to pop), especially on tracks lacking much in the way of low-end. These wouldn't make great jazz / classical earbuds - strings and keyboards just don't have the depth of a good balanced-armature IEM like the hf2's.


The treble end of the equation is a mixed win for the MA350's. The amount of detail able to be drawn out by these headphones amazed me - I've never heard something on this side of the $50 mark quite so able to extract the subtleties of a song. The little, imperceptibly quiet things that you just don't hear on a cheap set of headphones without maxing the volume (and, as a result, destroying your ears). The drawback is that the MA350's are also very bright - without a heap of bass to balance out the equation, songs heavy on cymbals, snare drums, and other sibilant percussion can become grating and harsh. The same goes for very high vocals, or particularly shrill guitar squeals.

I found the soundstage a little wider than I expected, but nothing to write home about - which is to say, still a million times better than Apple earbuds. Instrument separation was solid, though I found this was one area where my hf2's very noticeably bested the MA350's.


Overall, the MA350's produce great sound for the price, though I'd advise you to explore other options if you're into classical, jazz, or mellower / classic rock. The MA350's are tuned great for modern rock, pop, and are plenty suitable for hip-hop. Electronica listeners may demand yet more bass, though I'd argue the MA350's have plenty for anyone who does not actively endeavor to distort their music.


The Fit


I won't say the MA350's fit brilliantly - I lost seal at times - but they do fit very well. While walking, they didn't dislodge themselves. The only difficulty really stemmed from getting them in correctly in the first place, which I found was best achieved by lodging them unusually loosely into my ears, probably due to the interesting chopped-off-egg shape of the tips. Still, once they were in, they generally stayed in. The machined aluminum housing makes them feel rather durable, as well, and didn't cause my ears any discomfort (aside from the fact that they're icy-cold when you first put them on).

The cord is evil. It's a very light and narrow fabric-wrapped affair, and it gets tangled and knotted up like sewing string when left to move about in your pocket. That really annoyed me, but it's far from a dealbreaker. The cord also makes a fair bit of noise, though that's the tradeoff of fabric - you don't get the annoying reverberation when the cord strikes your body/clothing, but you do when it slides up against anything.


When it comes to earbuds, my judgment of fit is generally reduced to a binary result: good or bad. The MA350's fall squarely into the "good" category.


Conclusion


I really like the MA350's. These are the sort of headphones I'd recommend to my friends who aren't particularly interested in sound, but who suffer through overpriced products like Apple's god-awful earbuds (even the new ones sound pretty terrible), or whatever marked-up Skullcandy crap Best Buy puts in the smartphone aisle. For $40, you're getting an experience, I would say, that matches or exceeds many earbuds at twice that price.


I reviewed the MA350's because I find that many of our readers tend to think spending anything more than $50 on headphones is just excessive, so I wanted to showcase something a little more economical. While I still disagree vehemently and absolutely with the notion that something like the eargasmic $400 UE 900's simply "aren't worth it," I can understand wanting the most bang for your buck - who doesn't?


In that sense, I think the MA350's are an absolutely stellar headphone. I'd argue that, compared to numerous earbuds around the $100 mark that I've tried, you're getting 90% (or more) of the performance at around 50% of the price. That's serious value.

Read the full article at Android Police

Find out more about the MA350.

Coolsmartphone

MA350:
It’s not often that a product appears that blows me away but the MA350′s have certainly achieved it.

MA350:

Whilst the majority of Britain’s manufacturing industry has disappeared, there is one area where the UK still excels and produces some of the best equipment in the world and that area is audio.

With companies such as Cambridge Audio, Roth, Creek, Wharfedale and Meridian to name but a few, the UK has always produced top quality audio products in order to replicate lifelike sound.

One company producing and manufacturing this high quality equipment and with products on sale in Apple stores in Australia and America is RHA.

RHA produce a variety of different headphones and earphones from their R&D department in Glasgow, Scotland.  One such product is the RHA MA350′s.

According to RHA, the MA350′s design is inspired by the aerophonic shape of a trumpet’s bell.  They are machined from solid aircraft grade aluminium which is then partially anodised in matt black.

They have a braided anti-tangle cord which is 1.2 metres long, gold plated connections, come with 3 sets of tips (small, medium and large) and a black carry case.

Upon opening the MA350′s my first thought was how good they look.  Many in ear earphones at this price point all look alike with the same bland design but not the RHA’s.  Exactly as described, the trumpet shaped body that is hewn from aluminium and the braided cable make for a great look.  The tips (I used the medium ones) are comfortable and fit nice and snugly within the ear.

I am one of those that listens to an awful lot of music from many different genres.  Podcasts are a growing penchant too and so I have had a wide variety of ways with which to test and compare.  My usual earphones of choice are the Klipsch S4A’s  which fall into a slightly different price bracket than the RHA MA350′s but make a good comparison nonetheless.

The MA350′s have good noise isolating capabilities, traffic noise whilst walking was minimal even with no sound playing and virtually non-existent with music playing – Perhaps not a good choice for the cyclist!

The 10mm mylar drivers ensure that the quality of sound is great across the frequencies, never sounding too harsh or too soft.  I tested them with a variety of tracks from Eric Bibb’s Saucer and Cup to Sinead O’Conner’s Nothing Compares to You  whilst taking in Jeff Wyne’s War of the Worlds and the Cistercian Monks of Stift Heiligenkreuz (yes seriously!)  All of these were handled with ease and there appeared none of the strain that can be heard with lesser and sometimes more expensive earphones.

A favourite of mine to test the bass levels is Usher’s Yeah and when played at full volume there was no sign of distortion at all, quite an achievement!!

In summary, the MA350′s are priced at £29.95 and come with a 3 year warranty direct from RHA.  At this price point you would be extremely hard pressed to find anything that comes close to achieving the sound quality or build quality, indeed I would expect to pay double the asking price for this particular pair of earphones.

It’s not often that a product appears that blows me away but the MA350′s have certainly achieved it and my Klipsch have now fallen into second choice. If you are in the market for a new pair of earphones I cannot recommend these highly enough!

Read the full article at Coolsmartphone

Find out more about the MA350.

Gadgeteer

MA350:
RHA have released an earphone that can compete with anything in its price range- and above.

MA350:

There are two approaches to reviewing earphones or headphones and which direction I take is determined mostly by price. Earphones that sell for less than $100 are judged on a different level than those costing double or triple. The market for the under $100 earphones is huge and only getting bigger, plus the sound quality in this price range has improved dramatically. And when you factor in the lousy audio quality of those trendy white buds, it’s not hard to see why the lower priced earphone market is exploding. A Scottish audio company has now jumped in the fray with some earphones and headphones. RHA (Reid and Heath Acoustics) has supplied their entry level dynamic speaker earphones for review, the MA350 noise isolating earphones.

Although tastefully done, the design of the MA350 earphones is not particularly exciting, just functional looking. Included in the box are three sizes of tips which should fit almost anyone – but not me. As I’ve said in many reviews, the seal that earphone tips provide means everything and the supplied tips just don’t provide the seal I need. No seal equals no bass. So, once again, I used tips from another brand of earphone that fit my ears, and I can now hear what the MA350s are supposed to sound like. The supplied tips will probably fit your ears, but a more varied selection would have been nice. Comply is a good source of replacement tips made of foam and they do have tips for this brand. Also included is a small, velour draw-string bag for carrying.

RHA calls the MA350 earphones “noise isolating.” While they will cancel out most external noise quite well, the isolation is passive, which means they work the same way as shoving fingers in your ears. Note: Active noise isolation requires microphones and a power source to work properly.

Interestingly, the MA350s lean towards the bright side. Bass is present and powerful, as you would expect from a dynamic type earphone, but the high frequencies remind me of an armature design. Weird. Note: dynamic speaker design simply means the speaker inside the earphone looks almost like a tiny speaker. An armature design is a totally different approach and borrows technology from hearing aids. Dynamic earphones are usually warmer sounding with powerful bass and armatures are more accurate and clinical sounding. There are pros and cons on each approach, and which is better is subjective, at best.

As I said earlier, the MA350s are machined out of solid aluminum. They are extremely light and feel very durable. I have worn them for hours with no discomfort. The cloth covered cord minimizes but does not prevent tangling. Cloth can also cut down on microphonics – that annoying thumping sound you get from scraping or tapping the cord, but does not eliminate it. I noticed that the cord can sometimes get folds and creases which can’t be totally removed. It’s not harmful to the wiring, but it also doesn’t instill a lot of confidence against future problems. Time will tell.

Did I say that the MA350s are only $40? One reason is that the MA350s do not have a mic or remote. If you wish to have those add-ons, RHA makes the more expensive  MA450i, which I will review later. Other than that, the MA350s are a bargain and a half. Here’s a spoiler: the MA350 earphones sound as good and are as comfortable as many earphones I’ve heard – and liked – In the sub-$100 range. So how good does 40 bucks sound?

The MA350 earphones have a kick in volume and attack… not that common in this price range. Listen to Bryan Ferry’s “Valentine.” from the album, “Boys and Girls.” The percussion throughout the song is sharp and immediate. Attack (and decay) is when a speaker – whether it’s a headphone or earphone – can recover quickly so notes don’t bleed into one another. That’s a good thing. The MA350s recover quickly. No, they are not the most accurate earphones I’ve ever heard, but did I mention that they are only $40? Thought so.

AC/DC’s “You Shook Me All Night Long” is an exercise in production done exactly right. I am a huge fan of this group’s sound. It is clean, sharp and a kick in the teeth. The MA350s capture that power and reproduce it very well. When pushed to punishing levels however, distortion can and does appear. But by then, the volume has become painfully loud anyway.

“Raconte-Moi Une Histoire,” by the French electronic group M83,  is a jaunty, upbeat song featuring a little girl’s vocals overlaid on a driving, synth beat. Some of the song gets muddled towards the end and the MA350s accentuate the highs a bit too much, but overall, the earphones help make the song a fun listen.

RHA have released an earphone that can compete with anything in its price rang – and above. Of course, there is no comparison when sampled against those free white buds from you-know-who. If you have the money and a discerning ear, look elsewhere. But if you are on a budget and/or need an inexpensive second pair of earphones for commuting or exercise, you can’t do much better than the MA350s.

Read the full article at Gadgeteer

Find out more about the MA350.

MA350:
An extremely capable set of headphones available at a very good price.

MA350:
These earplug-style headphones are designed and sold by British newcomer RHA. They have a number of pairs headphones on the market, but these are the first in-ear designs, and very impressive they are too.
At this price these can't be described as high-end earplugs, but the audio quality leaves us with little to complain about. They are bassier than most earplugs using a 10mm driver; and while some may enjoy a flatter, more neutral sound, others will prefer the MA-350's richer deep tones. Despite this tendency to the lower end, it's not overly at the expense of other frequencies, so those with eclectic tastes don't have to worry. In fact, we found a pleasing warmth about the sound on orchestral pieces.

Read the full article at http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/headphones/1286452/rha-ma-350

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